Employment has reached another all-time high – but pay rises are still being outstripped by inflation. The number of people in work went up by by 125,000 to 32.07 million in the three months to June, with the employment rate hitting a record 75.1 per cent.

The number of EU citizens in the workforce also reached a new high, despite fears that the referendum result could have triggered an exodus.  Pay growth picked up pace slightly, easing the pressure on cash-strapped households.

UK_Employment

The number of people in work went up by by 125,000 to 32.07 million in the three months to June, with the employment rate hitting a record 75.1 per cent. The Office for National Statistics (ONS) said wages increased by the equivalent of 2.1 per cent a year for April to June, up from 2 per cent from March to May.

But the figure was still well below the rate of inflation, which has been running as high as 2.9 per cent on the CPI measure over the period. Once inflation is taken into account, total pay in real terms fell by 0.5 per cent both including and excluding bonuses. There were an estimated 2.37 million people from EU member states excluding Britain in employment between April and June this year. The figure is up by 126,000 on the same period in 2016 – which included the Brexit vote – and the highest number since comparable records started 20 years ago.

Statistics covering workers’ country of birth rather than nationality also showed an increase. Office for National Statistics senior labour market statistician Matt Hughes said: “The number of workers born elsewhere in the EU continues to increase, but the annual rate of change has slowed markedly.” Within the overall tally of EU workers, different trends are apparent when the statistics are broken down by groups of nations. In the second quarter of this year there were just over one million nationals of 14 long-term member states including Germany, Italy, Spain and France employed in the UK.

The number of EU citizens working in the UK has hit a new record high, official figures show. There were an estimated 2.37 million people from EU member states excluding Britain in employment between April and June this year.

The figure is up by 126,000 on the same period in 2016 – which included the Brexit vote – and the highest number since comparable records started 20 years ago.

Statistics covering workers’ country of birth rather than nationality also showed an increase. In the second quarter of this year there were just over one million nationals of 14 long-term member states including Germany, Italy, Spain and France employed in the UK. This figure has increased from 947,000 during the equivalent three months of 2016, when the EU referendum was held. There has also been a rise in the number of Romanians and Bulgarians working in the UK, passing the third of a million mark to reach 337,000 in April-June. Romania and Bulgaria joined the EU in 2007 and restrictions on citizens of the two countries working in Britain were lifted in January 2014.

In contrast to rises across the other country groups, the figures show a fall in the number of nationals of eight central and eastern European states working in the UK. There were an estimated 997,000 employees from the so-called EUA8 countries which joined the union in 2004 – Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia. This number was down by around 11,000 compared to a year earlier and the first time since the referendum that it has dipped below a million.

This figure has increased from 947,000 during the equivalent three months of 2016, when the EU referendum was held. There has also been a rise in the number of Romanians and Bulgarians working in the UK, passing the third of a million mark to reach 337,000 in April-June.

Romania and Bulgaria joined the EU in 2007 and restrictions on citizens of the two countries working in Britain were lifted in January 2014.

The rise in the cost of living held steady at an annualised rate of 2.6 per cent in July, in line with the rate for June.

ONS senior labour market statistician Matt Hughes said: ‘The employment picture remains strong, with a new record high employment rate and another fall in the unemployment rate.

‘Despite the strong jobs picture, however, real earnings continue to decline.’

In fresh evidence of the strength of the jobs market, the unemployment rate dropping by 0.2 per cent to 4.4 per cent for the three months to June, its lowest level since 1975.

The number of people out of work fell by 57,000 on the quarter to 1.48 million – a 12-year low.

Meanwhile, the so-called claimant count fell by 4,200 in July to 807,800.

Employment Minister Damian Hinds said: ‘These statistics show that record levels of people are in work across the country and earning a wage, which is great news.

‘Over the past year the rise in employment has been overwhelmingly driven by permanent and full-time jobs, as employers continue to invest in Britain’s strong economy.

‘The task now is to build on this success through Jobcentre Plus and our employment programmes so that everybody can benefit from the opportunities being created.’

Sterling, which has been in the doldrums this week, bounced on the news.

The pound was up 0.2 per cent against the dollar at 1.28 US dollars, while the British currency flirted with 1.10 euros, up 0.3 per cent on the day.

 

Source; DailyMail

Frankfurt and Dublin are emerging as the winners of the race race to snap up the post-Brexit banking spoils, a board member of Germany’s Bundesbank has said.
Bundesbank board member Andreas Dombret has told Germany’s Der Spiegelmagazine that 20 big financial institutions are in negotiations to shift their operations to the banks of the river Main in Frankfurt.

“We are in the decisive phase of location decisions … and it is clear that Dublin and Frankfurt are profiting particularly,” said Mr Dombret. “Above all, the big American banks are concentrating themselves on these two cities.”

FT_Brexit_01

According to Mr Dombret, responsible for banking regulation, the British-based institutions are looking for more than just a German banking licence to continue trading inside the EU. They are anxious to shift entire brokerage, investment banking and traders operations.

Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs are among the biggest operators in these areas.

For the Bundesbank, the price for a banking licence in Germany will be adherence to German and European banking rules and a serious, sustainable presence in Frankfurt – not a brass plate operation – Mr Dombret said.

“We are demanding from the institutions that they build up qualified personnel for all core areas: management, risk management, compliance, anti-money laundering and finance departments as well as critical IT functions. And that has been agreed.”

The Bundesbank and state government of Hesse have lobbied hard for Frankfurt, citing proximity to the European Central Bank and the euro system’s largest member bank. In addition, they point to high standards of living in the central Main river region, strong infrastructure and good schools.

One of the first institutions to up-sticks is likely to be Deutsche Bank, which is expected move to Frankfurt several thousand of its 9,000 employees in London in its clearing, risk control, legal and reporting departments.

Morgan Stanley is doubling its Frankfurt presence, as is Goldman Sachs.

A year after the Brexit vote, most German banking analysts say it is clear that there will be no one big winner from the shift away from London.

Head-count boost

Germany’s banking association expects between 3,000 and 5,000 jobs to be shifted to Frankfurt in the coming two years. At least a dozen banks in Frankfurt will expand their pre-existing operations, it forecasts, boosting head counts by up to 400 employees each.

“There won’t be a Brexit bang and suddenly thousands of bank employees are with their families in Frankfurt,” said Mr Stefan Winter, head of the German banking association. “In five years, Frankfurt will feel the Brexit effect more strongly than in two years.”

A similar view is shared by the head of Bafin, the federal financial supervisory authority.

“Frankfurt is playing a leading role,” Bafin president Felix Hufeld told Der Spiegel. “Most of the big banks are pursuing a strategy of not putting all their eggs in one basket.”

In Ireland, Citigroup and JP Morgan have announced plans to expand in Dublin as a result of Brexit, with Bank of America Merrill Lynch to apply for a broker-dealer licence here, as it moves certain activities from London.

Source: IrishTimes

German employment rate has hit the highest since reunification in 1990 while the number of home building permits fell in the first half of the year, data showed in August 2017, sending mixed signals about the state of Europe’s biggest economy.

In a positive sign for household spending and tax revenues with Germany’s growing population, employment reached a record 44.2 million people in the second quarter, data from the Statistics Office showed.

Workers-Germany

Employment between April and June 2017 rose by 475,000 on the quarter and by 664,000 on the year, the data showed.

Among the companies creating more jobs were information and communication firms, education and health providers, restaurants as well as construction firms.
Separately, data from the Federal Statistics Office showed that German authorities issued some 13,400 fewer residential building permits in the first half of the year compared with the first six months of 2016.

Home building has become a key driver of economic expansion in Germany as increased job security and record-low borrowing costs are boosting demand for real estate.

Higher state spending on roads, bridges and social housing, partly to accommodate a record influx of refugees over the past two years, is giving construction additional support.

Source: Reuters

Application for traineeship in the European is now open. A paid traineeship of 5 months with the European Commission, starting on either 1st March or 1st October, 2018. Every year, there are about 1.300 places available. If you are one of the selected candidates you get hands-on experience in the international and multicultural environment. This can be an important enrichment for your further career.

 

EU_Commission_traineeships

You will receive a monthly grant of 1,159.40 EUR as of 1st March 2018 and reimbursement of travel expenses. Accident and health insurance can also be provided.

Trainees work all over the European Commission. The content of the job largely depends on the service you are assigned to. You may, for example, work in the field of competition law, human resources, environmental policy. A typical trainee’s daily work mainly consists of:

  • Attending and organising meetings, working groups, forums, public hearings;
  • Researching and compiling documentation, reports, consultations, answering queries;
  • Running projects.

What does the traineeship offer?

  • EU knowledge – insight into the processes and policies of the European Institutions;
  • Practical experience – an opportunity to play a part in the Commission’s day-to-day business;
  • Opportunity to put academic theory into practice.

What do we expect from you?

  • Openness to European matters;
  • Willingness to learn about the Commission’s working methods;
  • Contribution to our everyday work with a fresh point of view;
  • Proactive attitude.

The traineeship programme is open to university graduates, from all over the world who have a:

  1. Degree of at least 3 years of study (minimum a Bachelor);
  2. Very good knowledge of English or French or German (C1/C2 level in accordance with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages);
  3. Very good knowledge of a second EU official language (required for nationals of EU countries).

You must have completed at least 3-years of study with a degree to apply for a Blue Book traineeship. Only if you have a certificate or an official confirmation from your university that you have at least a 3-year degree will you be eligible to apply.

Translation traineeships

If you apply for translation traineeships (in the Directorate-General for Translation) you must be able to translate into your main language (normally your native language) from 2 other official EU languages (source languages):

  • Your main language must be one of the official EU languages.
  • Your 1st source language must be English, French or German.
  • Your 2nd source language can be any of the official EU languages

Deadline for applications: 31st August 2017 (12:00 noon, Brussels time).

You can apply once per session but as many times as you want until you are finally selected. If you do not pass the pre-selection, or you are in the Blue Book but not selected for a traineeship, you will have to submit again your application. It will undergo again the pre-selection with no guarantee that you will successfully pass it and be in the Blue Book again.

Article 2.2.2 of the rules governing the official traineeships scheme of the European Commission must be interpreted as excluding the mother tongue/s, which is/are not assessed with points in the first phase of the pre-selection exercise. Points are awarded on the basis of merits.

Therefore, if English, French or German is your mother tongue (also as a non-EU citizen), you must have a very good and certified knowledge of at least one of the other two working/procedural languages of the Commission.

If you are not an English, French or German native speaker as an EU citizen, then you need to have a very good knowledge of English, French or German in addition to your mother tongue.

The level of linguistic knowledge must qualify as “very good knowledge”, be accompanied by duly certified proof and correspond to a C1/C2 level in accordance with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages).

 

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Highest net salaries in July 2017 among EU capitals have been paid in Luxembourg, where an average net wage was EUR 3,042.07. On the other end workers in Sofia have reported 6 times lower average wages for this month which makes Sofia the worst performing EU capital according to the average salaries with only  EUR 550.52 paid.

Based on the Numbeo data on average cost of living we have prepared the list of EU Capitals according to the net salaries. Unlike other surveys that take into considerations official statistics for salaries paid, Numbeo generates the data based on the feedback users have reported. according to data available for July 2017, best performing cities are Luxembourg and Copenhagen in Denmark, while the lowest wages are paid in Sofia, Bulgaria and Bucharest, Romania.

Regional discrepancies remain huge across the EU, so workers in best performing cities on average earn up to 6 times more than those in Bulgaria and Romania.

Average net EU salaries

 

Madrid in Spain and Rome in Italy are on the level of the EU average, since their residents earn around EUR 1500 per month.  There is the trend in which residents of capitals in Eastern and South Europe earn much less then residents of a western EU capitals. So the bottom of the list mostly entails the capitals in Easter Europe and in Balkans. Full data has been shown in the table below.

CITY Average Monthly Net Salary (After Tax)
Luxembourg  €                 3,042.07
Copenhagen  €                 2,729.99
Helsinki  €                 2,537.47
London  €                 2,521.24
Paris  €                 2,398.12
Amsterdam  €                 2,392.50
Stockholm  €                 2,391.28
Dublin  €                 2,353.21
Brussels  €                 2,023.21
Berlin  €                 2,003.66
Vienna  €                 1,920.77
Madrid  €                 1,519.67
Rome  €                 1,420.29
Nicosia  €                 1,290.36
Valletta  €                 1,116.67
Ljubljana  €                 1,059.51
Prague  €                    983.30
Bratislava  €                    932.49
Tallinn  €                    923.32
Warsaw  €                    913.66
Lisbon  €                    891.91
Zagreb  €                    817.83
Athens  €                    705.85
Vilnius  €                    677.29
Riga  €                    631.53
Budapest  €                    620.18
Bucharest  €                    563.47
Sofia  €                    550.52

 

 

 

 

 

Some 322 thousands net jobs will be created across all three Belgian regions between 2016 and 2022.

This emerges from the regional economic perspectives from 2017 to 2022 published by the Federal Planning Bureau, and the 3 regional statistical institutes (IWEPS, SVR and IBSA). Growth in Wallonia and Brussels may, during this period, marginally come up to that of Flanders.

NewJobs_JobsEurope

Economic growth may mostly be higher between 2016 and 2018 in the Flemish region (1.7percent) than in Wallonia (1.3 percent) and in Brussels (1.1 percent). However, the differences between the regions will be partially captivated between 2019 and 2022, with GDP growth of 1.6 percent in Flanders, and 1.3 percent for the other 2 regions. These values are stated in the estimates.

Across the entire period from 2016 to 2022, net job creation could go up to 30,100 people per anum in Flanders (+1.1 percent), comparing to 10,700 in Wallonia (up 0.8 percent) and 5,100 in Brussels (up 0.7 percent). The years 2016, 2017 and 2020, taken together, will be predominantly fertile in this field.

At the same time, the unemployment rate is likely to continuously decline in the 3 regions. Indeed, the unemployment rate is predicted to go, in Brussels, from 18.4 percent in 2016 to 14.5 percent in 2022. Over the same period it is expected to decrease from 15.1 percent to 11.9 percent in Wallonia and from 7.8 percent to 5.1 percent in Flanders.

Across the entire period from 2016 to 2022, the active population is projected to increase by an average of 0.5 percent per year in Flanders and in Brussels, and by an average of 0.4 percent in Wallonia.

Furthermore, over the same period, the Flemish region may record a real-terms increase in productivity gains per capita of 0.5 percent per anum in the various market industries. In Wallonia and Brussels, this increase may be slightly less pronounced (0.4 percent).

 

Source: The Brussels Times

During the first three months of 2016, the average rate of employment in OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries was 67.4 percent.
This was in fact indicated on Monday by the OECD. In Belgium, the rate of employment was only 62.2 percent. Within the Eurozone, the rate of employment increased by 0.2 % to 65.9 percent.

LabourMarketBelgium

 

Source: OECD Employment Outlook 2017 – Results for Belgium

Belgium still comes towards the bottom of the rankings concerning its rate of employment. Only five OECD countries out of 35, have an even lower employment rate. These are Turkey (50.9 percent), Greece (52.7 percent)), Italy (57.7 percent)), Spain (60.4 percent)) and Mexico (61.4 percent)).

Results have been published on June 13th 2017 in the OECD Employment Outlook 2017. You can read the full outlook on the OECD Website.
Source: OECD

BERLIN (Alliance News) – Germany’s manufacturing employment increased in May 2017 from a year ago, data from Destatis showed Monday.

The number of people that have worked in local manufacturing units rose by around 78,000 or 1.4 percent compering the period of May 2016. At the end of May 2017, there were 5.5 million employed persons in local manufacturing units.

The number of hours worked in May climbed 10.7 percent from a year earlier, reaching 721 million. The earnings totaled EUR 24.7 billion, which was 3.1 percent more than in May 2016.

Source: Interactive Investor, DESTATIS

Almost one in 5 young Italians are neither employed, job-seeking, nor in full-time study, according to an EU-wide study.

The Italian figure of 19.9 % was close to double the EU average of 11.5 %, though it had seen a slight drop from the previous year’s figure of 21.4 %.  Nevertheless, Italy is a home to the highest percentage of 15-24-year-olds classified as ‘Neet’ (Not engaged in education, employment or training) by the annual Employment and Social Developments in Europe (ESDE) review.

 Italy has the highest youth unemployment

Another worrying statistic which emerged from the report was the proportion of Italians considered to be living in extreme poverty, which had risen to 11.9 %. Italy was one of only three countries included in the review where this figure rose between 2015 and 2016, the other two being Estonia and Romania.

Youth unemployment in Italy (in the under-35 age bracket) had actually fallen since the report’s last edition, down to 37.8 percent compared to 40.3 % the previous year, but it was still the country with the third highest figure, behind Greece and Spain.

And among those young people who had found work, Italians were more likely than their peers abroad to have an irregular contract, putting them at “considerably greater risk of job insecurity”, according to the report.

More than 15 %t of Italian employees aged between 25 and 39 had this kind of contract, compared to less than five percent in the UK, for example.

Italy also had one of the highest proportions of self-employed people, at 22.6 %, and youngsters were likely to earn significantly less than their older counterparts.

On average, an Italian worker aged under 30 earns 60 % less than an over-60-year-old, according to the study.

Across the EU, employment figures rose in 2016, but the ESDE writers commented that despite overall growth, there was “a particularly heavy burden on younger generations”, a trend clearly visible in Italy.

Worries over uncertainty in the job market appeared to have had a marked impact on other aspects of Italian millennials’ lives too. The typical Italian leaves home and has their first child aged between 31 and 32, five years after the average young European.

 

Source: TheLocal.it

UN_FLAG

Many of the UN agencies have headquarters office in Italy. Likewise, Rome is home to the FAO, WFP and FAD, Brindisi is host to a major UN logistics base, with the mandate to provide support to peacekeeping operations, and the Staff College training institute for UN officers has its office in Turin.

As all agencies have difference recruitment policies, to find a UN job in Italy you have to visit employment pages of the each agency which is active in the country. To ease your work we have made a list of links toward employment pages of UN agencies in Italy.

 

# Name of the Agency Cities Link
1 CGIAR Rome http://www.cgiar.org/vacancies/
2 FAO Rome Link
3 ICCROM Rome and others ICC ROME
4 ICGEB Trieste http://www.icgeb.org/vacancies.html
5 ICTP Trieste https://www.ictp.it/about-ictp/personnel-office/employment.aspx
6 IFAD Rome and others IFAD Employment
7 IOM Rome and others http://italy.iom.int/it/chi-siamo/collabora-con-noi
8 ITCILO Turin ITC Employment
9 UNDESA Rome and others http://www.undesa.it/index.php/other-opportunities/
10 UNHCR Rome and others https://www.unhcr.it/vacancies
11 UNICEF Rome and others http://www.unicef.it//gpl/105/ags/2/indice.htm
12 UNICRI Turin http://unicri.it/institute/join_us/jobs/vacancies/
13 UNIDO Rome and others http://www.unido.it/ita/job.php
14 UNSSC Rome http://www.unssc.org/about-unssc/employment-opportunities/
15 WFP Rome and others http://www1.wfp.org/careers/job-openings
16 WHO Europe Venice WHO Fixed Term
17 WHO Europe Venice WHO Short Term

All agencies have their different application systems. In the most cases you will be required to set up an account on the Agency website, and create professional profile. When the position is opened you just need to apply for a position with a simple click. Other agencies will require you to send your resume along with Personal History form and Letter of application on the indicated Email address, this is a case with IOM jobs and UNIDO jobs.